Cancer Treatment Centers of America Launches New Integrative Tool

Did you know that Cancer Treatment Centers of America is now using Clinical Pathways? This new data center, launched with the help of AllScripts and NantHealth is now a key part of how treatment works at CTCA. This custom technical solution is just what the doctor ordered for CTCA, as they continue to work toward ensuring that each patient gets the treatment they need to fight their unique case with cancer. This treatment solution is to be integrated with ease, and with as many appropriate treatment options as possible. This data has been reviewed and used by hundreds of oncologists around the country, and generally this data is often pushed to the side only for the use of publication in journals, rather than used for the good of integrating into a treatment plan.

Cancer Treatment Centers of America is based out of Boca Raton, Florida, and has five hospitals that are a part of its network around the country. This for-profit network of hospitals is dedicated to the treatment of cancer and the well-being of the whole patient as well as their families. Serving patients around the United States is what the CTCA is for, and now new integrative therapies are showing promise for these patients and their outcome. The main goal of the CTCA is to address the true and immediate need of the patient along with the advanced technology that can best help the doctor and the patient get the desired results of their treatment.

The very first center was founded in 1988, and has grown into a fine network of hospitals to help patients get care around the country. The basis for their approach is always compassion while making sure that all patients get the very best care and help that they can get while restoring hope to the patient.

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Honey Birdette; Growth and Use of Technology to Increase Sales

Business in the fashion industry has grown massively in the recent days. This growth is becoming rapid through the help of technology. Companies use e-commerce and online platforms to increase their target customers and their sales. Honey Birdette is not left out on this issue. Honey Birdette is a company that was founded in Brisbane Australia by Eloise Monaghan. It was established in 2006. A US online store was launched after a rapid increase of 374% in sales within a period of 12 months.

This new e-commerce platform has expanded the customer base and improved the customer experience. They offer delivery services to their clients in the US. They have a free delivery service for those who purchase products worth 50 dollars and above. Honey Birdette is also increasing its retail stores targeting premium locations where they can reach and serve their target customers. It plans to expand its UK stores count as it also targets the US market for more retail openings in future. This will make it more accessible to its wide range of customers across the continent. Honey Birdette has close to 10 stores in Australia where it was founded. They have competitive prices for their products that range from 35 dollars for briefs and 60 dollars for bras.

Honey Birdette expanded its territorial boundaries by opening its first store outside Australia last year. They established other stores in Leeds Victoria and Westfield white city. Honey Birdette is set to open more stores. It has revealed the opening of 40 stores by the end of the year and ten more stores at Westfield Stratford Leeds Newcastle and Liverpool. Honey Birdette has opened its first sensuality online boutique with a presence on both Facebook and Pinterest. The site is easy to navigate because it is detailed. It is meant to serve three regions that include United States-Canada, United Kingdom-Europe, and Australia-New Zealand. The future of all businesses across the world is online. Honey Birdette has embraced it and is making great waves in the fashion industry.

With Bottom-Up Ideology, Avaaz Takes Its Direction From Its Members

Avaaz.org has been called the world’s largest online civil activism network. Centered in the United States and active since 2007, Avaaz was founded by two organization, MoveOn.org and Res Publica. MoveOn.org is a nonprofit advocacy group for progressive causes, and Res Publica is a private-sector organization aimed at promoting democracy and good civic and governmental behavior.

The president and executive director of Avaaz is Ricken Patel, who formerly worked for the International Crisis Group in Afghanistan, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Sudan. Mr. Patel earned a degree in Politics, Philosophy, and Economics (PPE) at Oxford University in the United Kingdom and a master’s degree in Public Policy at Harvard University in the United States. Patel is Canadian-British.

Funding for Avaaz comes from individual donations of $5,000 or less from its members. Avaaz does not take larger donations from individuals or any donations from corporations. From 2007-2009, Avaaz received funding from various foundations, although it has not taken any corporate or foundation donations since then. Since 2009, Avaaz’s members have contributed more than $20 million.

Campaigns directed by Avaaz are managed by a team working in more than 30 countries around the world, including Brazil, India, Lebanon, and the U.K. These workers use e-mail to contact members about campaign strategies involving e-mail writing campaigns to government officials, video sharing, and public petitions. In some cases, members are also involved in advertisements, demonstrations, and publicity stunts that draw attention to various causes.

Avaaz’s campaigns are suggested by members to a panel of specialists. If the specialists believe a campaign idea has merit, they poll 10,000 members. If those members approve the campaign, it is then opened up for voting to all the remaining members. According to its leadership, Avaaz has no ideology beyond “practical idealism.” Campaign suggestions flow through the organization in an organic, democratic process.

The organization gets its name from an old Persian word for “voice” or “song,” with many related cognates in other Indo-European languages, including the word “voice” in English.